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Teenchy duck.

By FRÉDÉRIC ORTOLI
From The Book of Stories for the Storyteller by Fanny E. Coe.

Start of Story

"Perhaps I can be of some service to you," said Brother Wolf. "Shall I go with you?" "I am willing," said Teenchy Duck. "But how can I go so far?" Brother Wolf asked. "Get into my satchel," said Teenchy Duck, "and I'll carry you as best I can." "It is too small," said Brother Wolf. "It will stretch mightily," said Teenchy Duck. So Brother Wolf also got into the satchel with Brother Fox. Teenchy went on her way again. She didn't walk very fast, for her satchel was heavy; but she never ceased crying: "Quack! quack! Give me back my beautiful money!" Now it happened, as she was going along, she came up with a Ladder, which said, without asking after her health: "My poor Teenchy Duck! You do not seem to be very happy." "I should think not!" exclaimed Teenchy Duck. "What can the matter be?" the Ladder asked. Teenchy Duck then told her story over again. "I am not doing anything at present," said the Ladder, "shall I go with you?" "Yes," said Teenchy Duck. "But how can I go, I who never walk?" inquired the Ladder. "Why, get into my satchel," said Teenchy Duck, "and I'll carry you the best I know how."



The Ladder was soon in the satchel with Brother Fox and Brother Wolf, and Teenchy Duck went on her way, following the tracks of the Prince of the Seven Golden Cows, and always crying: "Quack! quack! Give me back my beautiful money!" Going along and crying thus, Teenchy Duck came to her best and oldest friend, the River. "What are you doing here?" said the River, in astonishment, "and why are you crying so? When I saw you this morning you seemed very happy." "Ah!" said Teenchy Duck, "would you believe it? I have not eaten since yesterday." "And why not?" asked the sympathetic River. "You saw me find the purse of gold," said Teenchy Duck, "and you saw the Prince seize it. Ah, well! my master will kill me if I do not get it and return it to him." "Sometimes," the River replied, "a little help does a great deal of good. Shall I go with you?" "I should be very happy," said Teenchy Duck. "But how can I follow you--I that have no limbs?" said the River. "Get into my satchel," said Teenchy Duck. "I'll carry you as best I can."



Then the River got into the satchel by the side of the other friends of Teenchy Duck. She went on her journey, keeping her eyes on the ground, so as not to lose sight of the tracks of the thief, but still crying for her beautiful money. On her way she came to a Bee-Hive, which had a mind to laugh because Teenchy Duck was carrying such a burden. "Hey, my poor Teenchy Duck! What a big fat satchel you have there," said the Bee-Hive. "I'm not in the humour for joking, my dear," said Teenchy Duck. "Why are you so sad?" "I have been very unfortunate, good little people," said Teenchy Duck, addressing herself to the Bees, and then she told her story. "Shall we go with you?" asked the Bees. "Yes, yes!" exclaimed Teenchy Duck. "In these days of sorrow I stand in need of friends." "How shall we follow you?" asked the Bees. "Get into my satchel," said Teenchy Duck. "I'll carry you the best I know how." Then the Bees shook their wings for joy and swarmed into the satchel along with the other friends of Teenchy Duck.



She went on her way always crying for the return of her beautiful money. She walked and walked without stopping to rest a moment, until her legs almost refused to carry her. At last, just as night was coming on, Teenchy Duck saw with joy that the tracks of the Prince of the Seven Golden Cows stopped at the iron gate that barred the way to a splendid castle. "Ah!" she exclaimed, "I have arrived at my journey's end, and I have no need to knock on the gate. I will creep under." Teenchy Duck entered the grounds and cried out: "Quack! quack! Give me back my beautiful money!" The Prince heard her and laughed scornfully. How could a poor Teenchy Duck compel a great lord to return the purse of gold? Teenchy Duck continued to cry: "Quack! quack! Give me back my beautiful money!" It was night, and the Prince of the Seven Golden Cows ordered one of his servants to take Teenchy Duck and shut her up in the henhouse with the turkeys, the geese, and the chickens, thinking that these fowls would kill the stranger, and that her disagreeable song would for ever be at an end. This order was immediately carried out by the servant, but no sooner had Teenchy Duck entered the henhouse than she exclaimed: "Brother Fox, if you do not come to my aid, I am lost."

       



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